Archive


20-28 Segment 1: Poker: A Game Of Skill & Luck

Texas Hold ‘Em is the most popular poker game in the U.S. today. It’s a game of strategy, psychology and quick decision-making. Writer and professional poker player Maria Konnikova joins Viewpoints’ to share how she was able to use her background to master the game and amass more than $300,000 in winnings in just three years.

20-28 Segment 2: The Business Of Lab-Grown Meat

Millions of Americans have embraced plant-based meat like the Impossible Burger, but how do you feel about real meat that’s grown in a petri dish in a lab? If the taste, texture and smell exactly resembled meat that was traditionally farmed outside, would you eat it? Lab-grown, cell-cultured chicken, beef and pork is set to hit the mass market in just a few years. What’s the science and process behind this new technology?

20-27 Segment 1: The Good And The Bad: A Brief History Of The Texas Rangers

20-27 Segment 1: The Good And The Bad: A Brief History Of The Texas Rangers

The Texas Rangers (no, not the baseball team) but the western law enforcement agency dating back to 1823 is known for patrolling the rugged Texas terrain. For almost 200 years, its members have protected tiny towns along the border and have helped solve numerous crimes and corruption throughout the state. However, the valiant group also has a darker history filled with corruption, murder and violence against minorities. Author and journalist Doug Swanson joins Viewpoints this week to share the full picture of the famed Texas Rangers.

20-27 Segment 2: Is Instagram The New Online Diary For Generation Z?

20-27 Segment 2: Is Instagram The New Online Diary For Generation Z?

While some of us still prefer pen and paper, many younger people are shifting to everything digital. And it’s not just for to-do lists or communication, but also using platforms like Instagram, Twitter or Facebook as a daily, reflective ‘online diary’. However, sometimes this vulnerability in such a public setting can lead down a slippery slope. We discuss the pros and cons of candidly sharing your life on social media.

20-26 Segment 1: The Calming Nature Of Tending To A Garden

20-26 Segment 1: The Calming Nature Of Tending To A Garden

Getting started gardening can seem like an overwhelming task, especially if you have trouble keeping a houseplant alive. But with some research and a small investment for tools, seeds and soil, the rewards of tending to a garden are huge. Fresh produce, flowers and herbs, as well as a renewed connection to nature are just some of the benefits of this increasingly popular outdoor hobby.

20-26 Segment 2: Is Your Child Feeling Anxious Right Now? Giving Support Without Shielding Them From The World

20-26 Segment 2: Is Your Child Feeling Anxious Right Now? Giving Support Without Shielding Them From The World

The days when election and campaign news dominated the news cycle seem so distant. It’s safe to say that no one could’ve imagined this year would be such a curveball. Learning’s been disrupted, many parents are continuing to work from home and fears over COVID-19 are still very much present. We speak with a family trauma expert, Dr. Abigail Gewirtz, about dealing with these anxieties as an adult and how to have important conversations with your child or teen if you’re sensing that they’re more irritable, worried or anxious lately.

20-25 Segment 1: Shakeups In The Salon & Skincare Industry

Business owners have had an extremely stressful year as COVID-19 forced millions of shops to close their doors for two plus months. Now, as much of the country is reopen, some salon, spa and wellness owners are still anxious about if many customers will return and the current changes to operations to protect both staff and clientele. We speak with three owners about adapting to this new reality and the challenges they’re facing.

20-25 Segment 2: Exploring The World Of Wine One Glass At A Time

20-25 Segment 2: Exploring The World Of Wine One Glass At A Time

Finding the right wine is intimidating. Strolling through the wine aisle, it can sometimes be easier to give up and choose a bottle based off whether you like the label or not. Wine is complex. However, if you’re interested in finding out more about the refreshment, you have to start somewhere. Sommelier Elizabeth Schneider joins Viewpoints this week to give us an introduction to all things wine.

20-24 Segment 1: The Murder Of George Floyd: A Deepening Public Health Crisis

20-24 Segment 1: The Murder Of George Floyd: A Deepening Public Health Crisis

George Floyd was 46 years old when he was murdered on the street by ex-Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. The father of five moved to the Midwest city in 2014 where he worked driving a truck and providing security at a local restaurant. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Floyd lost his security job. On May 25, Floyd was suspected of using a counterfeit $20 bill at a local store and officers were called to the scene. The question remains: how can a simple police call lead to the killing of an unarmed and unresisting man? For weeks, protests and outrage have spread across the U.S. and internationally as the killing of Floyd brings racial inequality and police brutality into focus once again. Even in the midst of a pandemic, people are showing up to say they’re fed up with the lack of equal justice, rights and opportunities for all.

20-24 Segment 2: Navigating Peak Wedding Season During A Pandemic

20-24 Segment 2: Navigating Peak Wedding Season During A Pandemic

In April, May and June of this year, 550,000 weddings across the U.S. were set to take place. As the threat of COVID-19 swept much of the U.S., many of these pre-planned weddings had to be rescheduled. Viewpoints speaks with Erika Hernandez-Fullerton, a recent bride herself and owner of a wedding planning company, to find out how couples in this predicament are making the best of this unusual situation.

20-23 Segment 2: The Many Firsts Throughout History

20-23 Segment 2: The Many Firsts Throughout History

Imagine finding a rough, circular rock-like object and spending many minutes, if not hours, trying to pry it open to see what’s inside. Once you finally cracked it open, who would slurp down the slimy, raw interior of an oyster, praying that it wouldn’t kill them? We discuss the many firsts throughout history and the bold civilizations who uncovered these discoveries.

20-23 Segment 1: One Country, Two Systems: The Deepening Political Crisis In Hong Kong

20-23 Segment 1: One Country, Two Systems: The Deepening Political Crisis In Hong Kong

Tensions between the people of Hong Kong and the Chinese communist government are quickly escalating in recent months. With the proposal of a new national security law in late May further tightening the grip on the semi-autonomous territory of Hong Kong, the city is a tipping point as protesters risk their lives to fight for political democracy and civil liberties.

20-22 Segment 2: Served Up: Poetry With A Side Of Dark Humor

20-22 Segment 2: Served Up: Poetry With A Side Of Dark Humor

The Epic of Gilgamesh is thought to be the oldest epic poem ever written, created in 2000 BCE. Throughout time, poetry has stayed constant, with greats like Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson and Henry Thoreau publishing cherished works still topical today. John Kenney is a modern poet whose work is frequently featured in the New Yorker. He’s best known for his collection of Love Poems for Married People and joins Viewpoints this week to share his many musings and provide some words of advice when it comes to writing.

20-22 Segment 2: The Story of Apollo 8

20-21 Segment 2: The Story of Apollo 8

When we think back to the biggest space accomplishments in history, many of us instantly remember Apollo 11 – the mission that landed humans on the moon. However, we seldom talk about Apollo 8 when astronauts successfully orbited the moon. Author and historian, Jeffrey Kluger joins Viewpoints to discuss why Apollo 8 was a vital foundational mission for space travel and what it meant to the future of NASA.

20-20 Segment 1: The Inner Tolls Of Working In Dining – A Feature With Chef Iliana Regan

Iliana Regan has worked in the restaurant industry for more than two decades in almost every position imaginable. From fast service to high-end fine dining, she’s a self-taught, Michelin-starred chef that’s known for her ability to create masterful dishes using naturally sourced and foraged ingredients. As her career has skyrocketed up, she’s also had several low points in her life that have impacted who she is today.

20-20 Segment 2: Millennial Money: Leveraging Your Worth

Jessica Byrne is a 26-year-old software engineer from Portland that’s saved more than $300,000 in a very short span of time. We speak with Byrne about how she grew her skill base in order to up her salary and then quickly save thousands through compounding interest, investing and maintaining a frugal lifestyle.

20-19 Segment 1: An Essential Industry: Construction In The U.S.

20-19 Segment 1: An Essential Industry: Construction In The U.S.

In most states, construction is deemed an essential service during the COVID-19 pandemic. With roadways fairly clear and schools temporarily closed, crews are getting to work while still adhering to social distancing rules. In effect, construction spending was up 4.7 percent in March 2020 compared to March 2019. Viewpoints speaks with two people working in the industry to get an inside view on growth and job opportunities as well as current challenges facing the sector.

20-19 Segment 2: The Rise Of Coffee Capitalism

20-19 Segment 2: The Rise Of Coffee Capitalism

Even as Americans shelter-in-place, coffee consumption is up in the first four months of 2020. Why is coffee a drink that is so popular across the globe? The drink was first consumed by Sufi monks in the fifteenth century as part of a religious ceremony, but quickly gained popularity across the Middle East where it then eventually spread to Europe. Viewpoints discusses the complicated history of coffee production and American’s reliance on this caffeine-packed drink.

CULTURE CRASH: Finding Indie Films

Culture Crash: Finding Indie Films

Older films are hard to find these days on mainstream streaming platforms like Netflix and Hulu. We delve into how to track down some of the best indie, classic and foreign films to watch from your home sofa.

20-16 Segment 1: Modern-Day Drones And The Implementation Of Remote Identification

20-16 Segment 1: Modern-Day Drones And The Implementation Of Remote Identification

Drones are already a multi-billion-dollar business and only set to grow in revenue over the next five years, reaching an estimated 63 billion by 2025. The unmanned aircraft systems can be applied to a wide breadth of tasks and are an essential resource during war, rescue and public health crises, including the COVID-19 pandemic. Viewpoints speaks with two drone experts about innovation and security challenges facing the industry.

Deploying School Meals To Those Who Need Them Most Right Now

20-15 Segment 1: Deploying School Meals To Those Who Need Them Most Right Now

On a typical day, the National School Lunch Program serves 20.2 million free lunches to students in need, according to the USDA. With sweeping school closures across the U.S. in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of students are going hungry. Viewpoints discusses the new reality foodservice workers face and the balance between staying safe and serving meals.

20-15 Segment 2: Why Do Crosswords Never Go Out Of Style?

20-15 Segment 2: Why Do Crosswords Never Go Out Of Style?

The first published crossword was created in 1913 by journalist Arthur Wynne. Since then, the timeless puzzle has stayed in style and graces newspapers from the New York Times to USA Today. Self-acclaimed lovers of crosswords are known as ‘cruciverbalists’ and compete online as well as create these puzzles for publishing. We speak with crossword expert, Adrienne Raphel to find out more about this beloved word game.

20-14 Segment 2: Drew Barrymore On Life, Love & Family

20-14 Segment 2: Drew Barrymore On Life, Love & Family

Everyone remembers little Gertie from the movie E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial and the actress who played the part: Drew Barrymore. However, a lot has changed since then. Today, Barrymore is mother of two, accomplished actress, businesswoman and now, author. In her new memoir she opens up about growing up in Hollywood, fending for herself at age 14 and what she’s learned over the years.

20-13 Segment 1: Cannabis: A Complicated History

20-13 Segment 1: Cannabis: A Complicated History

Human use of cannabis dates back to tens of thousands of years ago. And the drug wasn’t just used in medicinal or recreational settings, but also part of religious ceremonies or used by warriors before wartime battle. We speak with pharmacology expert Dr. Richard Miller about the drugs global history and its prohibition in the U.S. over the last 70 years.

20-12 Segment 1: The Wonders Of Removing Clothing Clutter

20-12 Segment 1: The Wonders Of Removing Clothing Clutter

Ever feel like each morning you look at your closet, and despite the large number of clothes, never really have anything to wear? This abundance of extra fabric not only takes up space but also can be a burden to your headspace. We speak with two experts about how to shop and consume less as well as best organize the items you already have.

20-09 Segment 2: The Role Of Companies In Protecting The Planet’s Biodiversity

20-09 Segment 2: The Role Of Companies In Protecting The Planet’s Biodiversity

1,000,000 animal and plant species now face the threat of extinction. As more than 80 percent of all global biodiversity lives on private land, what is the role of corporations when it comes to protecting these endangered species? Viewpoints speaks with Margaret O’ Gorman, president of the Wildlife Habitat Council, about the creative and adaptive policies companies can take to make a difference.

20-08 Segment 1: Redefining Sugar: Enjoying Sweet Treats Without The Guilt

From Starbucks lattes to grocery staples like yogurt and bread, sugar still seems to be lurking everywhere. And even if you are diet conscious, it can still be hard to avoid the cookies and cake if you’re craving something sweet. Viewpoints Radio speaks with baking blogger, Elif Yamangil and cookbook author, Jennifer Tyler Lee about the importance of limiting sugar in your diet and how to do so without completely restricting yourself and still indulging your sweet tooth.

20-08 Segment 2: Born Into Slavery: Firsthand Perspectives Of Formerly Enslaved Men And Women

Imagine being born into slavery in the South. You don’t have a dime to your name, received no education and all you know are the surrounding fields of the plantation you worked on. What would you do after the abolishment of slavery? How would you start over? February is Black History Month – and as we remember the past and the period of slavery in America, it’s important to not only take in the perspectives of historians and educators, but also direct firsthand accounts from those formerly enslaved. Viewpoints’ speaks with historian and photographer, Richard Cahan, co-author of the new book River of Blood: American Slavery From the People Who Lived It.

20-07 Segment 1: Coloring Outside The Lines

20-07 Segment 1: Coloring Outside The Lines

Coloring books aimed at children, adults and even seniors have been all the rage in recent years and are still trending in 2020. But what’s so special about these patterns and designs that draw people in? We delve into the process of putting together these collections and why the creative outlet has become a mainstay for so many looking to switch off and de-stress.

20-07 Segment 2: Rethinking Healthcare: How Do You Fix A Flawed System?

20-07 Segment 2: Rethinking Healthcare: How Do You Fix A Flawed System?

The topic of healthcare is one of the most debated issues so far in the 2020 election – but what’s the fix for the expensive, inefficient system that’s currently in place? So far it’s a murky answer. Millions are struggling with the high cost of care, doctors are burning out and patient-doctor interaction is at an all-time low. We speak with an industry expert about the current woes of American healthcare and what can be done.

Voter Error: How A Trip To The DMV Turned Into Years Of Legal Woes

20-06 Segment 1: Voter Error: How A Trip To The DMV Turned Into Years Of Legal Woes

Can it ever be too easy to cast a ballot in an American election? The answer is yes. Filipino immigrant Elizabeth Keathley mistakenly registered to vote while at a DMV in Illinois through a law best known as the Motor Voter Law. This originally well-intentioned program is now trapping hundreds of immigrants into federal charges and possible deportation for an act they didn’t fully comprehend to begin with.

20-05 Segment 1: World War II: The Women Of The OSS

More than 75 years ago, a diverse set of men and women making up the Office of Strategic Services were united together in their determination to win World War II. Some served as government spies or propagandists and others gathered intelligence for army invasions. Whatever role they played, the OSS staff worked tirelessly for years and rose to the challenge wherever they were needed.

20-05 Segment 2: Frustrated By The 24/7 Political News Machine? Get Involved Instead.

20-05 Segment 2: Frustrated By The 24/7 Political News Machine? Get Involved Instead.

It seems like lately political news has hit an all-time high with all of the continuous impeachment coverage and campaign trail updates, including the start of the Iowa caucuses this week. While it’s important to be an informed citizen, are you putting all of this knowledge to use? Is it leading to change? Could you do something better with your time? We delve into these questions and more this week on Viewpoints.

Culture Crash: Scary Winter Reads

We explore Ian Reid’s horror novel, “I’m Thinking of Ending Things” that tops our list of scariest books of all time. It’s a quick read with a twisting plot that keeps you hooked all the way through.

Finding Joy Again Through Small Changes

20-04 Segment 1: Finding Joy Again Through Small Changes

When life gets tough, or busy, or just complicated, it can be hard to find gratitude in the little things. We speak with two authors about the importance of taking small steps each day to bring back positivity and refocus in your life. This could mean something as simple as taking 15 minutes to do some deep-breathing, reading or catch up with a friend by phone.

20-04 Segment 2: A New Mindset On Exercise: Taking Small Steps to Make A Big Difference

20-04 Segment 2: A New Mindset On Exercise: Taking Small Steps to Make A Big Difference

Hate the stair master? Dread the treadmill? Exercise doesn’t have to be an anxiety-inducing, hour-long activity. It can be getting a group of friends together for an axe-throwing session or even going on a ten-minute walk during lunch. Each little bit of movement matters. We uncover how taking on a different mindset to activity can lead to better habits and a happier life.

Culture Crash: Oscar Season

This year’s Oscar nominations are out and there are some good contenders in the mix, but a few movies that were snubbed from nominations. We delve into some of our favorite films from 2019 that didn’t make the cut, but are still worth the watch.

20-03 Segment 2: Why Are Young People Struggling More Than Previous Generations?

20-03 Segment 2: Why Are Young People Struggling More Than Previous Generations?

Roughly 15 percent of 25 to 35-year-old’s are back living with their parents, according to a 2018 study by Pew Research Center – and this number is only on the rise. Higher rent, cost of living and student debt are all contributing factors, however, there are some young adults stuck in an unmotivated, directionless state often labeled as “failure to launch.” We break down the term and what parents can do to nudge their young adults along.

20-03 Segment 1: Arctic Exploration: The Demise Of The 1881 Greely Expedition

20-03 Segment 1: Arctic Exploration: The Demise Of The 1881 Greely Expedition

In 1881, Lt. Adolphus Greely and 24 men set out on a voyage to explore the northernmost Polar Arctic where few had ventured before. The goal was to collect vast amounts of scientific data of the unknown region and hopefully reach the North Pole. But the expedition soon went awry when no resupply made it to the camp for two years and the men were left to fend for themselves. Starvation, frostbite and even tales of cannibalism soon followed in this historic tale of exploration and survival.

Culture Crash: Dave Eggers: A Leader In Literary Writing

Culture Crash: Dave Eggers: A Leader In Literary Writing

Throughout his career, Eggers has pushed the boundaries of writing, and no book better illustrates his desire to innovate than his 2014 novel, Your Fathers, Where Are They? And the Prophets, Do They Live Forever? It’s a book that consists only of dialogue. Each line is introduced with a single dash, and while it sounds complicated, the form actually makes it very straight-forward and easy to follow. It’s a revenge fantasy ethical debate featuring an unreliable main character who keeps kidnapping people.

20-02 Segment 1: Spreading Word Of The 2020 U.S. Census

20-02 Segment 1: Spreading Word Of The 2020 U.S. Census

Did you know that the census count each decade helps decide where 675 billion dollars in federal funding is spent each year? The 2020 census is just around the corner, officially starting in March. To help spread the word, Viewpoints’ sits down with a Victoria Glasier from the U.S. Census Bureau to find out the just how easy it is to fill out your census form this year and new ways that the government is reaching K-12 students and their families.

20-02 Segment 2: Addiction: Why It Happens And How To Help Addicts Back From The Edge

Millions of Americans are addicted to alcohol and drugs – and many eventually end up unemployed, broken, separated from their families and homeless. We talk to an author who’s battled alcohol and drug addiction for many years and finally found help through treatment. We also speak with a psychologist about the root causes of addiction and why some people are more prone than others.

20-01 Segment 1: A Brief History Of Skin Marking

Humans have always practiced various forms of self-expression, whether it’s through written word, music, art or some other outlet. The art of tattooing is one such form that dates back thousands of years. We speak with a history expert, author and professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Craig Koslofsky about some of the earliest tattoo designs and how they were achieved, as well as other skin alteration methods including scarification and branding.

20-01 Segment 2: The Pitfalls Of Social Media As An Athlete

20-01 Segment 2: The Pitfalls Of Social Media As An Athlete

Being a college or professional athlete is hard enough. Throw on top of that the constant commentary online and it can sometimes be impossible to look away from what people are saying. Two football players offer up their thoughts on the pros and cons of social media and how to stay focused and positive on and off the field.

19-52 Segment 1: Aging In America: The Senior Care Industry

19-52 Segment 1: Aging In America: The Senior Care Industry

Each day, 10,000 Americans will hit retirement age. With millions of people growing older every day, the need for home health aides is set to expand by 47 percent between 2016 and 2026, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. So – what are the best senior care options out there? How much does it cost per year? What’s it like working in home health aide industry?

19-51 Segment 2: The Annual Holiday Shopping Frenzy

19-51 Segment 2: The Annual Holiday Shopping Frenzy

Christmas is just a few days away. By now, most people have bought all of their presents and have tucked their worn-in credit cards away until the new year. Viewpoints’ speaks with Colin Morris, director of product management at Adobe Analytics, about some of the hottest items and shopping trends this year, as well as the estimated 143 billion dollars that Americans are set to spend just online during the 2019 holiday shopping season.

Culture Crash 19-51: Uncovering Some Of The Decade’s Best Forgotten Films

Culture Crash: Uncovering Some Of The Decade’s Best Forgotten Films

Thousands of movies have been released over the last ten years. With the mind-boggling amount of films available, it can be easy to forget about a fantastic movie you may have watched years ago. We take a look at some of the best picks of the decade that might not be getting as much attention as other films on your typical end-of-year/end-of-decade lists.

19-50 Segment 1: The Implications of A Shifting Climate

Extreme forest fires in California; increased flooding throughout the Midwest; rising sea levels threatening much of the coastal United States. Viewpoints speaks with author Avanti Centrae and ecologist Alejandro Frid about some of these extreme weather patterns and how people across the world are changing the way they live in order to adapt to this new landscape.

19-49 Segment 1: Top Dog: Helping Senior Dogs Find New Homes

19-49 Segment 1: Top Dog: Helping Senior Dogs Find New Homes

Did you know that only one out of every five dogs will finish their life with the family who originally took them home? Top Dog Foundation, specifically helps find new homes for senior dogs through a variety of programs. We speak with the founder of the organization, Jean Stelten-Beuning about the current need and how owners can plan ahead to ensure the long-term welfare of their pet.

19-49 Segment 2: Saving The Bully: Why We So Quickly Condemn ‘Troubled Children’

19-49 Segment 2: Saving The Bully: Why We So Quickly Condemn ‘Troubled Children’

While many schools have put in place comprehensive anti-bullying campaigns, we still seldom focus on ensuring that the child bullies get the help they need. We routinely punish troubled kids with harsh detentions, suspensions and from there it escalates onward. Because of this, many bullies seem to never get the proper support and get stuck in a perpetual cycle of trouble throughout their adult life. How can we shift our systems so these kids don’t fall through the cracks?

19-48 Segment 1: The Panama Canal: An Engineering Mammoth & Its Implications On Workers

The Panama Canal was one of the most treacherous builds in modern history. In the late 1800’s, the French took on the project and failed. Then, the U.S. took over its construction with a new plan in 1904. The man-made waterway spanning 51 miles took more than a decade to complete and resulted in the deaths of thousands of workers. Why did so many thousands die? What challenges did engineers and laborers face? We answer these questions and more.

19-48 Segment 2: What Can We Learn From How Other Cultures Approach Education?

19-48 Segment 2: What Can We Learn From How Other Cultures Approach Education?

Have you other wondered how children in other countries are taught? What are classrooms like? How are teachers educated? Class sizes? Teru Clavel, education expert and author, lived abroad and enrolled her three children in local schools to see the differences firsthand in learning. We speak with her about the major contrasts between Asia and U.S. school systems and the varying cultures.

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