The Entrepreneur Inside The Musician

21-30 Segment 2: The Entrepreneur Inside The Musician

There’s much more to being a professional musician than the practice and performance aspect of the career. For independent artists, there’s an entire side of entrepreneurship to handle, including money management, marketing, networking and more. Debra Silvert, the flutist of the orchestral ensemble, Duo Sequenza, highlights the challenges and rewards of carving out a career in the competitive classical music space.

21-29 Segment 1: Negotiating The High Cost Of Healthcare

Millions of Americans put off going to a doctor or hospital because they’re afraid of the high cost of care. Depending on your insurance, one MRI scan can cost upwards of a thousand dollars. One trip to the emergency room can mean thousands of dollars in charges that people can’t afford to pay. So, what’s driving these sky-high prices? How can people negotiate down these hefty bills?

21-29 Segment 2: The Dated Tradition of Daylight Saving Time

21-29 Segment 2: The Dated Tradition of Daylight Saving Time

Each year, as the flowers bloom and the days turn warmer, we spring forward and adjust our clocks one hour forward. The routine of ‘springing forward’ can feel like a nuisance and for some, it can severely throw off their internal body clocks for days or weeks on end. Why do we still practice daylight saving time today? Dr. Beth Malow, a neurologist and sleep expert, joins us this week on Viewpoints.

21-28 Segment 1: Long-Term Youth Incarceration

21-28 Segment 1: Long-Term Youth Incarceration

The U.S. prison population has decreased during the pandemic, but the number of people behind bars is still close to two million. Some of these inmates have been in prison for decades and at a young age were deemed by the justice system to be ‘unfixable’. This week, we shed light on the cycle of youth incarceration in this country and why people like Ian Manuel, a former inmate, were sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole at age 13.

21-28 Segment 2: A Better Way To Get Away

21-28 Segment 2: A Better Way To Get Away

It seems like lately almost everyone is heading to the airport. Whether you’re flying, driving or taking a train, vacations are a highly anticipated time to get away from everyday life. Everyone deserves relaxation, but is there a way to make sure that you’re traveling more consciously? Are you booking excursions with local, independent companies? Supporting small shops? Does the place you’re staying at or traveling with use sustainable practices?

21-27 Segment 1: Fair Labor: The Importance Of Worker Centers

21-27 Segment 1: Fair Labor: The Importance Of Worker Centers

Unions, which are organized labor groups, are prevalent across the U.S. You’ve probably heard of the term in the media or may know someone who’s part of a union. But, have you ever heard of a worker center? It operates in similar functions as unions; however, this resource is much more community-based and is more of a guiding advocate in responsive situations where the worker is facing harassment, unpaid wages or other issues. We speak with two labor experts this week to highlight how vital worker centers are to low-wage workers who often don’t have a voice.

21-27 Segment 2: How To Make Your Kid Money-Savvy

21-27 Segment 2: How To Make Your Kid Money-Savvy

All parents want their kids to succeed and live good lives, and part of accomplishing that is raising them to understand the value of a dollar. It’s can be easier than ever before for young children to see something online and feel like they need it, or waste money through an in-app game purchase. We speak with Beth Kobliner, a financial expert and author of the book Make Your Kid A Money Genius (Even if you’re not) about tips and tricks to help our children learn the value of each dollar.

21-26 Segment 1: The Top One Percent & The Accrual of Billions in Wealth

21-26 Segment 1: The Top One Percent & The Accrual of Billions in Wealth

The 50 richest families in the world have a combined net worth of $1.2 trillion dollars. The Koch family, the second richest name on the list, is worth a staggering $100 billion dollars. Could you imagine having that amount of money? It’s definitely enough to sustain several generations to come. How does one accumulate so much wealth? For many families, it isn’t just about success and business growth, but the business of building wealth through loopholes like philanthropy and loose taxation laws.

21-26 Segment 2: The Caregiver Crisis

21-26 Segment 2: The Caregiver Crisis

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that employee turnover at nursing homes in an average year is 74 percent. With high rates of turnover and not enough new workers entering the caregiving field, the U.S. is deep in a senior care crisis that’s only set to get worse. This week – two senior care experts join Viewpoints to discuss why no one wants these jobs and how this lack of infrastructure and funding in certain areas is creating chaos amongst seniors and their families who need help.

21-25 Segment 2: The Toll of Excess Clothes Production

21-25 Segment 2: The Toll Of Excess Clothes Production

The average clothing item today is worn anywhere from seven to ten times before it’s discarded on donated. Why is this number so low, and what happens once the garment leaves a person’s closet? Maxine Bedat, a prominent voice in sustainable fashion, joins us this week to shed some light on the clothing crisis and how its impacting workers and the environment.

21-24 Segment 1: The Environmental Effects Of Staggering Palm Oil Production

21-24 Segment 1: The Environmental Effects Of Staggering Palm Oil Production

In the U.S., most Americans commonly use vegetable or olive oil when cooking. While we don’t often here about palm oil, it’s in many of the products that we buy at the grocery store, including everything from food to personal care products. And abroad, palm oil is widely used in cooking and frying. Last year, global consumption reached 72 million tons. However, this ingredient is not being produced sustainably and has led to widespread deforestation in Southeast Asian countries. What’s being done to curb the palm oil crisis?

21-24 Segment 2: The Highs of Running

21-24 Segment 2: The Highs of Running

Imagine running 50 miles – almost double the distance of a typical marathon. Do you think you could ever do it? Dean Karnazes, an ultra-runner, joins Viewpoints this week to break down the extreme sport of ultra-marathons. He’s been tackling long distances and smashing records for several years and has made a name for himself in the running world. We hear his story and some tips he has for people who are trying to slowly ease into everyday running.

The Return Of Baseball At The Ballpark

21-23 Segment 1: The Return Of Baseball At The Ballpark

Baseball is back, and fans can once again revel in the experience of heading to a ballpark, grabbing some peanuts and cheering on their team as they score a homerun. Longtime baseball writer and faithful Phillies fan Timothy Malcolm joins Viewpoints this week to break down some of his favorite stadiums in the U.S. and some tips you should keep in mind before buying a ticket.

21-23 Segment 2: The Wedding Pages

21-23 Segment 2: The Wedding Pages

The first New York Times wedding announcement was published in 1851. It was one sentence long and covered a young, white couple who had just married in New York. Today, the wedding and engagements section at the paper and other media outlets across the country look a lot different. We explore how this unique page has evolved over the years and the rat race some couples go through to get an announcement published at a prominent paper like The New York Times.

21-22 Segment 1: The Debate On Invasive Species

21-22 Segment 1: The Debate On Invasive Species

Many people are worried that non-native plants and animals are invading the U.S. and preventing native species from thriving. Each year, a lot of money and time is spent trying to rid the land of these aliens - often to no avail. But, are these species present because they’re the only ones that can exist in that environment? Are some plants and animals actually helping to create a more diverse and robust ecosystem? And are some native species really native to the U.S.? Our guests offer up a different perspective on the invasive species debate.

21-21 Segment 1: The Cycle Of Food Waste

The average person ends up trashing 25 percent of the food they buy from the grocery store. This can mean fresh produce, expired dairy, stale bread – the list goes on and on. This cycle of food waste across households, grocery stores and restaurants adds up, resulting in more than 81 billion pounds of fresh, edible food being thrown away each year. What’s the solution? Two food experts join us this week to offer some answers.

21-21 Segment 2: The 40th Anniversary of The NASA Space Shuttle

21-21 Segment 2: The 40th Anniversary of The NASA Space Shuttle

The birth of the space shuttle in 1981 marked a new era of space travel. For the first time ever, NASA had a spacecraft that could launch into space and come back to earth and land like an airplane. While the shuttle had many successful flights, there were also some big catastrophes that ultimately led the program to cease operations in 2011. Former chief historian of NASA Roger Launius joins Viewpoints this week to tell the story of this era of American space history.