20-08 Segment 2: Born Into Slavery: Firsthand Perspectives Of Formerly Enslaved Men And Women

Imagine being born into slavery in the South. You don't have a dime to your name, received no education and all you know are the surrounding fields of the plantation you worked on. What would you do after the abolishment of slavery? How would you start over? February is Black History Month - and as we remember the past and the period of slavery in America, it’s important to not only take in the perspectives of historians and educators, but also direct firsthand accounts from those formerly enslaved. Viewpoints’ speaks with historian and photographer, Richard Cahan, co-author of the new book River of Blood: American Slavery From the People Who Lived It.

19-38 Segment 2: The Boom of Fast Food & It's Deep-Rooted Ties to American Culture

19-38 Segment 2: The Boom of Fast-Food & It’s Deep-Rooted Ties to American Culture

Most of us point to McDonald’s as the founding of fast food as we know it. But the American staple actually began nearly a hundred years ago with two chains, White Castle and A&W. We speak with Adam Chandler, journalist and author of Drive-Thru Dreams: A Journey Through the Heart of America’s Fast-Food Kingdom about the events that fed into the rapid rise of the fast-food industry and how different chains are fighting to stay present and on-trend in today’s competitive restaurant landscape.

19-32 Segment 2: The Complexities of Implicit Bias

What exactly is implicit bias and how does it form? We breakdown this complicated issue and discuss why it’s so important for parents to address implicit bias with kids early on through candid conversations and exposure to diverse environments.

19-31 Segment 2: The California Norco Shootout

We cover the Norco shootout of 1980 – an extravagant bank robbery by five heavily armed criminals ending in multiple lives lost, several wounded and a police helicopter shot down from the sky. We speak with author, Peter Houlahan about that fateful day and how it forever changed police response to organized crime.

19-25 Segment 2: The First U.S. Case of the Plague & Its Modern Implications

The first U.S. case of the plague presented in the early 1900’s in San Francisco. We speak with author, David Randall about the outbreak and how it changed sanitation practices and government response. Fast forward to today where the plague is still present in certain parts of the U.S. We speak with professor, Michael Antolin who studies modern day cases of the disease and its context within climate change.

19-22 Segment 1: The Storm on Our Shores: A Story of War, Loss & Forgiveness

  Pulitzer Prize-winning author and journalist Mark Obmascik shares the incredible story of two men fighting for opposing sides and tangled in the complexities of World War II in his book The Storm on Our Shores: One Island, Two Soldiers, and the Forgotten Battle of World War II. He exposes how our enemy isn’t as …

Continue reading 19-22 Segment 1: The Storm on Our Shores: A Story of War, Loss & Forgiveness

19-20 Segment 2: Louisa Adams – The Extraordinary First Lady You’ve Never Heard Of

We all know the names of famous First Ladies – Martha Washington, Mary Todd Lincoln, Eleanor Roosevelt, Nancy Reagan – and they all left their marks on our country in one way or another. One of these ladies that you probably don’t know much about is Louisa Adams, wife of President John Quincy Adams. Our guest has researched this extraordinary woman and discusses her strength, political wit and resilience.

19-16 Segment 1: The Gatekeeper: Missy LeHand and FDR

Everyone knows about the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt, but not many know about the powerful and loyal confidant FDR relied on, Marguerite “Missy” LeHand. Our guest discusses the life and work of this remarkable woman and how she helped and influenced one of the greatest chief executives of our time.

19-15 Segment 1: Removal of Confederate Statues

Statues commemorating the Confederacy remain in some towns in the US South, though its principles promoting slavery and oppression of blacks are in disrepute. Some towns have removed these statues in the face of heavy opposition. A former Mayor of New Orleans describes how his thinking evolved toward a decision to remove the statues in his city, and the issues it brought forth.

19-12 Segment 1: Life in the Shadow of the Columbine High School Shooting

On April 20, 1999, Sue Klebold’s son and his friend went into Columbine High School and committed one of the largest mass shootings in US history. Over the last 18 years, Klebold has been forced to cope with this horrible tragedy while managing anxiety attacks and being blamed by so many. Klebold talks about her story and the mental health messages she wants every American to know.

19-06 Segment 1: The History of Pirates

From Pirates of the Caribbean and Captain Hook to the Pittsburgh Pirates and Tampa Bay Buccaneers, pirates have a real foothold in our culture. But their history is anything but a fairy tale. Historian Eric Jay Dolin joins the show to discuss some of the most notorious real-life pirates to ever life.