21-08 Segment 1: The Tulsa Race Massacre

In the early 1900’s, the Greenwood District in Tulsa, Oklahoma was commonly referred to as the ‘Black Wall Street’. It was a predominantly African American town that was booming due to the nearby discovery of oil. It was a wonderful place to live, work and raise a family – but that all changed on May 31, 1921. In a matter of hours, the town was burnt to ashes and its estimated that up to 300 people were murdered. Historian Scott Ellsworth tells the largely untold story of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

20-08 Segment 2: Born Into Slavery: Firsthand Perspectives Of Formerly Enslaved Men And Women

Imagine being born into slavery in the South. You don't have a dime to your name, received no education and all you know are the surrounding fields of the plantation you worked on. What would you do after the abolishment of slavery? How would you start over? February is Black History Month - and as we remember the past and the period of slavery in America, it’s important to not only take in the perspectives of historians and educators, but also direct firsthand accounts from those formerly enslaved. Viewpoints’ speaks with historian and photographer, Richard Cahan, co-author of the new book River of Blood: American Slavery From the People Who Lived It.