21-08 Segment 1: The Tulsa Race Massacre

In the early 1900’s, the Greenwood District in Tulsa, Oklahoma was commonly referred to as the ‘Black Wall Street’. It was a predominantly African American town that was booming due to the nearby discovery of oil. It was a wonderful place to live, work and raise a family – but that all changed on May 31, 1921. In a matter of hours, the town was burnt to ashes and its estimated that up to 300 people were murdered. Historian Scott Ellsworth tells the largely untold story of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

20-51 Segment 1: The Unending Toll Of Discrimination

Segregation not only divides cities but leads to divided people as well. It fuels biases against people who may look or act different than us, leading to generations of inequity and discrimination. Viewpoints speaks with social justice activist, Tonika Johnson about the many impacts’ segregation has had on the city of Chicago.

19-15 Segment 1: Removal of Confederate Statues

Statues commemorating the Confederacy remain in some towns in the US South, though its principles promoting slavery and oppression of blacks are in disrepute. Some towns have removed these statues in the face of heavy opposition. A former Mayor of New Orleans describes how his thinking evolved toward a decision to remove the statues in his city, and the issues it brought forth.

Copyright: slasny / 123RF Stock Photo

18-12 Segment 1: Racism In 2018

We talk to experts on sociology and racism about what racism looks like in our modern world and what we all can be doing to help make the world more tolerant and less racially biased.