21-14 Segment 2: Alphabetical Arrangement

Organizing people or items by A to Z is a common method all over the world. It’s used in schools, businesses, libraries and more. But why is this the predominant method today? What are some other systems that people of the past used? Historian Judith Flanders joins us this week to shed some light on the fascinating study of alphabetization.

21-12 Segment 1: Siri, Self-Driving Cars And Disinformation On Social Media: The Ups & Downs Of Artificial Intelligence

21-13 Segment 1: Siri, Self-Driving Cars and Disinformation on Social Media: The Ups & Downs of Artificial Intelligence

AI software is everywhere these days. It’s built into cars, tech, robotics and used in numerous fields from stock portfolio management to pharmaceuticals. But, what does the future of artificial intelligence hold as this technology expands? How will current problems be exacerbated? AI expert and New York Times journalist, Cade Metz joins Viewpoints this week.

Culture Crash 21-11: Are You Team “Harry Potter” Books Or Films?

Culture Crash 21-11: Are You Team “Harry Potter” Books or Films?

It’s been almost 25 years since the first Harry Potter book was released. Today, the wizarding franchise is worth billions of dollars and has extended out to movie spinoffs, themed amusement parks, merchandise and more. We delve into the magical world and what sets the books apart from the films.

21-09 Segment 2: The Arctic Then vs. Now

21-09 Segment 2: The Arctic Then vs. Now

Over the last two decades, Arctic melt has increased by about 60 percent. It’s estimated that if all of the glaciers and ice caps were to disappear into the ocean, sea level would rise by 230 feet, wiping out all of the coastal cities and town around the globe. Journalist and author, Andrea Pitzer shares the history of Arctic exploration and how the landscape has changed over time – but not for the better.

21-08 Segment 1: The Tulsa Race Massacre

In the early 1900’s, the Greenwood District in Tulsa, Oklahoma was commonly referred to as the ‘Black Wall Street’. It was a predominantly African American town that was booming due to the nearby discovery of oil. It was a wonderful place to live, work and raise a family – but that all changed on May 31, 1921. In a matter of hours, the town was burnt to ashes and its estimated that up to 300 people were murdered. Historian Scott Ellsworth tells the largely untold story of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre.

21-06 Segment 2: The Birth Of Criminal Science In The U.S.

21-06 Segment 2: The Birth Of Criminal Science In The U.S.

Today, the field of forensic science is one of the most important tools that investigators have in cracking a case. From forensic geology to DNA analysis to ballistics, analyzing the science behind each crime is crucial. To better understand its beginnings, we go back to the twentieth century to shed a light on Edward Oscar Heinrich – an innovative man who made many contributions to early forensic science in the U.S.

21-03 Segment 2: Spies & Soldiers: The Women Of The Civil War

21-03 Segment 2: Spies & Soldiers: The Women Of The Civil War

We know so much about the men of the Civil War, but the courageous women of this time and their contributions are seldom shown in history books. Historian Karen Abbott decided to change that. She tells the story of several women who helped their respective sides during the Civil War. These women were not just nurses and aides, but endearing female soldiers and spies disguised and embedded in the fight.

Culture Crash 20-52: A Film Homage To “The Twilight Zone”

Culture Crash 20-52: A Film Homage to “The Twilight Zone”

We recommend the new movie, “The Vast of Night” now available to stream on Amazon Prime. It has the same vibes as “The Twilight Zone”, transporting viewers back to an entirely different time period.

20-51 Segment 2: Game Show History

20-52 Segment 2: Game Show History

Before the game shows of today, there were countless series of the past that defied our notion of showmanship. Full of grandiose props, charismatic hosts and the perfect, hand-picked contestants, these series kept viewers hooked till the very end and were (really) too good to be true. We discuss some of the most popular game shows in American history and how the industry has evolved over the last 70 years.

20-50 Segment 2: The Lasting Legacy Of Alex Trebek & Jeopardy!

20-50 Segment 2: The Lasting Legacy Of Alex Trebek & Jeopardy!

Alex Trebek hosted Jeopardy! for 37 seasons until his passing last month from pancreatic cancer. The trivia quiz series is unlike any other show on TV – and some would argue that a big part of what made it so entertaining was Trebek’s talent for leading the game. We explore his career legacy and what’s next for Jeopardy!.

20-49 Segment 1: Becoming Steve Jobs

20-49 Segment 1: Becoming Steve Jobs

Apple co-founder, Steve Jobs, was hailed as a genius and master innovator during his lifetime, but his career wasn’t always a smooth, upward trajectory. He failed many times and was eventually sidelined at Apple. We speak with one of his biographers about how Jobs changed his ways during this turbulent time, and how his experiences working with NeXt Computer and Pixar helped develop him into a savvier, more understanding leader.

20-48 Segment 1: The Early American Diet

Throughout history - war, famine, economic instability has affected what we choose to buy at the grocery store. Even today, the pandemic has shifted our grocery shopping and eating habits. This week, we rewind back to the Great Depression, which forced millions of Americans to find new recipes and get creative with the limited number of ingredients they could afford.

20-48 Segment 2: I Spy Delicious Pie

20-48 Segment 2: I Spy Delicious Pie

Boozy Pecan, Cranberry-Pear, Banana Crème. The many flavors and textures of pie are endless. Just because Thanksgiving and all-things pumpkin have passed, doesn’t mean an end to sugary holiday sweets. Viewpoints speaks with cookbook author Ken Haedrich about the prevalence of pie in American culture and how anyone – at any skill level – can bake a delicious pie in no time.

White Collar Crime: The Players & Its Economic Consequences

20-42 Segment 2: White Collar Crime: The Players & Its Economic Consequences

Each year, white collar crime results in losses that range between 300 and 800 billion dollars. Comparatively, other street-level crimes only total 16 billion dollars. Despite the huge cost, we seldom hear about lasting consequences for corporate offenders. We explore the prevalence of white-collar crime in our country and the systems that allow this corruption to flourish.

20-41 Segment 2: Why Is English So Hard To Learn?

We all know the rule: “I before E, except after C,” but it’s not applicable in “weird” or “science” or many other words. The English language has many exceptions to its rules and these irregularities make it a difficult language to learn. Two language experts join Viewpoints this week to share the many frustrations of English and the rules at play today.