20-03 Segment 1: Arctic Exploration: The Demise Of The 1881 Greely Expedition

In 1881, Lt. Adolphus Greely and 24 men set out on a voyage to explore the northernmost Polar Arctic where few had ventured before. The goal was to collect vast amounts of scientific data of the unknown region and hopefully reach the North Pole. But the expedition soon went awry when no resupply made it to the camp for two years and the men were left to fend for themselves. Starvation, frostbite and even tales of cannibalism soon followed in this historic tale of exploration and survival.

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20-01 Segment 1: A Brief History Of Skin Marking

Humans have always practiced various forms of self-expression, whether it’s through written word, music, art or some other outlet. The art of tattooing is one such form that dates back thousands of years. We speak with a history expert, author and professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Craig Koslofsky about some of the earliest tattoo designs and how they were achieved, as well as other skin alteration methods including scarification and branding.

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Culture Crash: Uncovering Some Of The Decade’s Best Forgotten Films

Thousands of movies have been released over the last ten years. With the mind-boggling amount of films available, it can be easy to forget about a fantastic movie you may have watched years ago. We take a look at some of the best picks of the decade that might not be getting as much attention as other films on your typical end-of-year/end-of-decade lists.

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19-48 Segment 1: The Panama Canal: An Engineering Mammoth & Its Implications On Workers

The Panama Canal was one of the most treacherous builds in modern history. In the late 1800’s, the French took on the project and failed. Then, the U.S. took over its construction with a new plan in 1904. The man-made waterway spanning 51 miles took more than a decade to complete and resulted in the deaths of thousands of workers. Why did so many thousands die? What challenges did engineers and laborers face? We answer these questions and more.

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19-44 Segment 1: The Undiscovered Photos Of WWII

It’s been almost 75 years since the end of World War II. With Veterans Day around the corner on Monday, November 11, we uncover some of the photographs taken from 1945, the final year of the conflict. These images show the sheer destruction caused by a war that lasted six years and cost millions and millions of lives. What was it like to be a U.S. Army Signal Corps photographer? What did they see? How do you move on after war?

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19-42 Segment 1: The Plight of the Strawberries

Strawberries are ubiquitous across the U.S. Supermarkets in every town stock cartons of fresh strawberries year round at a reasonable price. But this widespread availability may come to a halt in the near future as the industry faces several big challenges: labor shortages, climate change, sustainable farming legislation, etc. We discuss the history of the fickle fruit and how its evolved over time.

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19-41 Segment 1: Discovering Death: A Mortician’s Guide To Life

What happens if you pass away on an airplane or in outer space? Why do bugs only eat certain parts of your body? These are some of the questions Caitlin Doughty answers everyday and in her new book “Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs?” Viewpoints spoke with Doughty about why discussing death is still such a taboo topic in the U.S. and how our burial and funeral practices vary widely from other cultures.

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Inside Look: American Rodeo Today

Viewpoints producer Annie Krall interviewed the 2019-2020 National High School Rodeo Queen McKardy Kelly about her love of rodeo. and spoke to the executive director of the National High School Rodeo Association, James Higginbotham, about how rodeo is more than just a sport. It brings people together in the hectic pace of life today. The World #6 Professional Bull Rider Cody Teel also shares his passion for the dangerous sport and all the body parts he’s broken while on the job.

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19-38 Segment 2: The Boom of Fast-Food & It’s Deep-Rooted Ties to American Culture

Most of us point to McDonald’s as the founding of fast food as we know it. But the American staple actually began nearly a hundred years ago with two chains, White Castle and A&W. We speak with Adam Chandler, journalist and author of Drive-Thru Dreams: A Journey Through the Heart of America’s Fast-Food Kingdom about the events that fed into the rapid rise of the fast-food industry and how different chains are fighting to stay present and on-trend in today’s competitive restaurant landscape.

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