19-21 Segment 1: Color of Law

Racial segregation still persists throughout the U.S. One factor contributing to this inequality is the structure of our towns and cities. Richard Rothstein and Tonika Johnson talk about how past laws and our government created a divided demographic and the impact this has on certain populations.

Culture Crash 19-21: The New Album by Judah & The Lion

We discuss the new album Pep Talks from the band Judah & The Lion, most known for their 2016 single “Take It All Back”. The album features a funky, electronic vibe coupled with old-time folk and bluegrass instruments, offering a refreshing perspective in the alternative rock genre.

19-20 Segment 1: The End of Ice

Journalist and author Dahr Jamail exposes how climate change is affecting our ecosystems and natural landscape, including the melting and disappearance of massive ice glaciers. We discuss the long-term consequences of global warming and what we can do as a society to reverse the damage.

Culture Crash 19-20: A Greater Diversity Within Television

We examine how television series have grown to be more diverse and inclusive in the Peak TV era. One such show is Ramy, a new Hulu original, which candidly follows the life of a young, first-generation Muslim man and the challenges that arise with the melting pot of cultures.

Culture Crash 19-19: A Review of Elisabeth Moss in Her Smell

Elisabeth Moss stars in the new indie movie, Her Smell directed by Alex Ross Perry. The film follows Moss as she plays the chaotic role of fictional punk rocker, Becky Something, who is mentally unstable, addicted to drugs and clawing to get her life together.

Culture Crash 19-18: Beyonce’s Dominance in Pop Culture

We examine Beyonce’s consistent influence throughout all sectors of media. The visionary artist is known for her fierce demeanor and powerhouse concert performances, rewriting traditional female and black stereotypes in media.

Culture Crash 19-17: Adapting a Book Into a Movie: Annihilation

The sci-fi adventure movie, Annihilation, is based on a book but the adaptation is looser than what we typically expect. How director Alex Garland created something new.

Culture Crash 19-16: The End of Game of Thrones

The wildly popular TV show Game of Thrones is set to wrap up its story with six episodes this season, yet its fans may be unsatisfied. The TV show has departed the path of the books.

Culture Crash 19-15: The Increasing Cost of Cutting the Cord

Streaming services are multiplying, and none of them carry everything. Many people are finding that satisfying their TV viewing desires through streaming services is getting as expensive as cable.

Culture Crash 19-14: Sketch Comic Becomes Movies’ Hottest Horror Director

Jordan Peele used to be best known as a sketch comic, but his second film as a director, “Us,” is showing that the success of his first, “Get Out,” was no fluke.

Culture Crash 19-13: Summer Concerts

Summer is almost here, which means the concert and music festival season in almost in full swing. We talk a look at why a day at an amphitheater can stick with you for life.

Culture Crash 19-12: Junk Food TV

Sometimes you want to watch an expertly written and produced hour of television with central themes and a commentary on modern life… and sometimes, you just want to shut your brain off and watch something easy. This is about those latter experiences.

18-44 Segment 1: Looking Into Our Minds: How our brains perceive the world

There are all sorts of myths about how we can avoid dementia or how to best brainstorm a new idea. We talk to a psychologist and author to get the inside scoop on how our minds really work, and why we just can’t resist the urge to watch cute animal videos online.

18-43 Segment 1: Spiders & Bats: The truth behind the Halloween icons of fear

Spiders and bats are two of the most indelible symbols of Halloween fear across the country. We talk to experts to get the truth behind these traditionally scary creatures, and hear why neither of them are nearly as scary as we’ve been made to believe.

18-42 Segment 1: The Art of Video Games

Video games are often considered child’s play, or at least something below “real” art. Author Andrew Ervin argues that’s not true, and that video games are now big-business for TV networks and advertisers, as well as a source of true artfulness.

18-41 Segment 1: Stutters, Stammers, and Vocal Fillers

If you’ve had to speak in public, you know the nerves that come with public speaking. So you probably also know the pain of umming, uhhing, or misspeaking. We explore where these vocal blunders come from and what they might mean.

18-40 Segment 1: The Joy of Retirement: How people can look forward to retiring and make it the best time of their lives

Retirement can be bittersweet. On one hand, it’s something you build toward your whole life, but it can also be intimidated to lose your purpose in the workplace. We talk to Helen Wilkes about how she found a new passion in her retirement, and how she’s helping others make their retirements more fulfilling.

18-39 Segment 1: Hank Green on the Internet, Fame, and Our Reaction Culture

Hank Green has a massive internet presence as a podcaster, vlogger, tweeter, and more. Now, he’s become an author. His new book, An Absolutely Remarkable Thing, deals with internet fame and our reactionary culture head-on. He joins the show to discuss these issues, and whether is the internet is good.

18-38 Segment 1: The Uncertain Future of Cash

As technology evolves, more and more of us are relying on credit cards, debit cards and even apps like Venmo or Zelle to make payments. Gone are the days of physically cashing your check, now almost all of us use all direct-deposit. So what is the future of cash? We talk to one expert who lays out some of the nefarious uses of bills and coins.

18-36 Segment 1: Soldier Poetry

There’s a long history of soldiers processing their experiences through poetry. We talk to Adam Gilbert, a war historian and author of A Shadow on Our Hearts: Soldier-poetry, morality, and the American war in Vietnam about the history and future of these soldier poets.